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Kayla Does Her Research: Witchcraft & Magic

tryingtobehelpful:

Well basically this is just my own personal go-to sites when reading up on all I need to know for The Coven. Listed below are a bunch of sites dealing with magic, powers, witchcraft, etc. Now I am not saying that these sites tell the truth, or that you should believe what you read on these sites. I’m just saying this is what I go to when I need inspiration for my witches. If this helped you in any way please like or reblog. 


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April 24 2013 {♥ 150}

kaytriestorp

forbiddenforest:

THEME 07 BY FORBIDDENFOREST/EVREDEEN

Features:

300px by 1000px side image that automatically resizes
150px wide sidebar (note: you must check “sidebar” under the appearance options if you upload a sidebar!)
6 custom links

Rules:

Don’t redistribute or remove credit
Like/reblog this post if using!

Updates:

4/1/13: made audio posts nicer
Preview + Code

forbiddenforest:

THEME 07 BY FORBIDDENFOREST/EVREDEEN

Features:

  • 300px by 1000px side image that automatically resizes
  • 150px wide sidebar (note: you must check “sidebar” under the appearance options if you upload a sidebar!)
  • 6 custom links

Rules:

  • Don’t redistribute or remove credit
  • Like/reblog this post if using!

Updates:

  • 4/1/13: made audio posts nicer

Preview + Code


reblog

April 23 2013 {♥ 71}

forbiddenforest

SHIPS PAGE!
version 1: live preview | download
version 2: live preview | download

Rules:
- Do not remove any credit and claim it as your own.
If you are using any of the edits/gifs made by the others for the page, please give them credits.

How to install:
- Add a page to your blog.
- Choose “Custom Layout” for your page.
- Paste the code, save the page and it’s done.

Feel free to:
- Change the title image (if you are using version 1)
- Change the “«Back” image
- Change the fonts, sizes & colors
- Add more rows!
- Ask me questions! :)

Credit:
- the ships page by darren-criss
the box effect by pistachi-o
- Thank you! You guys are nice people!!

Please like or reblog if you are using this code. :)
Have fun with it!


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April 23 2013 {♥ 855}

theme-hunterrosesage

Quick Tips For Writing Samples

the-collisioncourse:

  • Always include dialogue to some degree. Why? Because that’s the entire basis for two characters communicating. People want to see how you write it, if you use proper punctuation or if you know how to make it interesting.
  • Never godmod a character in your sample. If you’re applying for a plot or a roleplay where the character yours is connected to is important, never write them into your sample. Why? It pisses off the people who play those characters.
  • If you can, show a character’s flaws within the sample. Flawed characters are always the ones that go the furthest, and to show the other roleplayer or admin that you understand how to give characters flaws and vices, you win bonus points.
  • Spell check. Seriously. Run it through an online spell check before you send it off. Why? Little mistakes can cost you.
  • If you’re applying for a 1x1 plot, look at the other writer’s samples. It honestly aggravates me when people don’t. People post their samples to show you how they write, what length they write and if they use a lot of description or dialogue — look at it before applying. 
  • If you’re wary about it, have someone else look it over before you submit it. A second opinion can always be helpful.


victoriousvocabulary:

How It’s Said (substitutes)
In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.
In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.
In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.
In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.
In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.
In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.
In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.
In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.
In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.
In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.
In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.
[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

victoriousvocabulary:

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]


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April 23 2013 {♥ 33527}

victoriousvocabulary

nunmurithemes:

Theme #22

Features: 
Custom links
Endless Scroll 
Show Captions 
Grayscale Posts
Sidebar Image Size: 50x50 px
Live Preview and Codes: here
Another example of background positioning: here
Background Credits: here

nunmurithemes:

Theme #22

Features: 

  • Custom links
  • Endless Scroll 
  • Show Captions 
  • Grayscale Posts
  • Sidebar Image Size: 50x50 px

Live Preview and Codes: here

Another example of background positioning: here

Background Credits: here


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April 23 2013 {♥ 217}

nunmurithemes

PSD#3 by fuyeahparamore.

Contains:

  • B/w Option;
  • Gradient;
  • Texture. 

Like or reblog this post if you taken.
(Download.)


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April 23 2013 {♥ 315}

sparrowrpsparamoresdaily

Military & PTSD Resources

writinghelpers:

I wasn’t sure exactly what branch you meant when you said “soldier,” so I decided to use this as an opportunity to get links for all four branches. I’ll start off with the Marines, since you said she might be a Marine, and I will put information about PTSD at the end of the post.

Marine Corps

Army

Air Force

Navy

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder


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April 23 2013 {♥ 1822}

writeworldwritinghelpers

enjalros:

Be Still My Love theme by enjalros

Live Preview | Download

Hello this theme will probably have a lot of bugs bc i made it in like .5 seconds use at own risk

  • hover over links
  • 2 extra links
  • 500px posts
  • this isn’t a base code so dont use it as one

Please like/reblog if you use! also don’t remove the credit or i’ll remove ur existence from this earth. 

<3:)


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April 23 2013 {♥ 156}

smellary

Writing Tips #54:Forty-five Flaws that Expose your Lack of Storytelling Experience, part 3

bookgeekconfessions:

This is part 3 in a series of 45 common writing mistakes which mark a writer as a rookie.  Parts 1 and 2 covered the first 18 mistakes. Here, then are mistakes 19 through 27:

image

19. Imbalanced dialogue attributions. I talked in part 2 about problems with tagging, and I should have thought to mention this problem with dialogue attribution along with it. The mistake lies in not finding the right balance between too many and too few attributions. If you put a “Jane said” on every single line of dialogue, that’s overkill. Similarly, not providing any attributions is also bad. The trick that often trips up rookie writers is that different kinds of conversations require different levels of attribution.

A typical conversation is between two characters. Theoretically, if you let us know who began the conversation, we ought to be able to track the entire rest of it by relying on the fact that people take turns when speaking. True in theory, but in practice you should add extra attributions if dialogue is interrupted by some substantial amount of narration, if there is a pause in the conversation, or once every few lines of dialogue in long, uninterrupted stretches of talk. An atypical conversation involves more than two people. Movies and TV shows have no problem with this, because we can see who’s talking. But in books, you can’t rely on the characters to take turns in any predictable order. In a novel, unless each character’s voice is so amazingly distinctive as to be unmistakable, you pretty much have to attribute everything.

20. Confusing names. In real life, you probably know dozens of people named John, Anne, Steve, and other such common names. In real life, sometimes that causes confusion. I’ve caught clients actually giving different characters the same name, and since they’re just people in a book and all we really have to go by are those names, it can be incredibly confusing. But fiction is not real life. In fiction, you have the luxury of keeping the names of all your significant characters distinct. So do that. Help your readers out by keeping the names of all your characters different. Ideally, try to keep the first letters of their names unique, and avoid pairs of names that have similar rhythm and cadence. Don’t give us “Taylor” and “Tucker,” for example. We’re bound to mix them up because they sound so much alike.

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